Adventure: Is it really for everyone?

20120606-013428.jpg Big Brother’s fortune at his “welcome to the family party” mere hours after he was declared our son in a court of law.

Tonight I found myself reminiscing about the past 1.5 years that Big Brother has been with us as I gazed upon the hundreds of pictures I have saved on my computer. Most of the pictures were taken during a time when he was trying something new. Pictures of Big Brother in a canoe, on a hike or in a cave are sandwiched among pictures of him playing with his brother or celebrating a holiday with family. He certainly has been on a lot of adventures since being home. I remember so clearly the words of concerned loved ones who were afraid that by adopting Big Brother, our adventurous lifestyle would come to an abrupt end. On the contrary, we have found that it has just begun.

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I truly believe with every fiber of my being that adventure really is for all. But does the world think so? Probably not. And although my brain is screaming that it doesn’t matter what the world thinks, I know in my heart that it does matter. It matters because I get tired of “defending” our right to be somewhere to others who think we should just stay at home. I want the world to know that my son with special needs has just as much right to venture out into this world as anyone else. He has just as much right to be on a hiking trail, at the climbing gym or on an airplane as anyone else. Although he may be unusually loud or need special accomodations at times, he is, after all, just the same as any other human being. There seems to always be people around us that act perturbed to see our family come near. Not everyone we encounter feels this way, but it’s happened enough that it really gets me thinking.

And then tonight as we sat in the office of our much loved pediatric specialist, he said something that grabbed my heart. “A lot of people with children like Big Brother tend to retreat to their homes and not venture out…”

What a shame that our society can make an innocent child feel like a burden to society, as if he is not worthy of the same rights to explore this world of ours.

So, if you see our family out and about and are bothered that the likes of us would join the ranks of ordinary adventurers, you may just get a kind but thorough lecture from me a la Ms. Cho style. I promise I don’t bite, but I will defend my creed of adventure for all fiercely and relentlessly.

How about you? What is something that you are willing to stand up to the world for…something you believe in so much that you are willing to raise your voice as to be heard by all the world?

“There can be no keener revelation of a society’s soul than the way in which it treats its children.” – Nelson Mandela

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P.S. Thanks for all the kind and encouraging comments on my last few posts. I may not have responded to each and every one, but please know they are all appreciated and loved by yours-truly. You are the best readers a gal could ever hope for!

8 thoughts on “Adventure: Is it really for everyone?

  1. Jayson

    I wanted to leave a very eloquent and dignified reply, but all I could muster up was “WOO HOO!”

    I’m a disabled man (so I can somewhat relate to certain adventure challenges) and I get some of the same looks when I go out and do things. There is an assumption that life and living it wondrously is reserved for those who are crafted perfectly. To them I prefer to stick out my tongue and hobbled right past them. How’s that for distinguished?

    Reply
  2. Suzi Smart

    Adventures are for everyone! Moreover, I firmly believe in the healing properties of nature and physical activity. Getting your son out into nature, moving, is great. I hope that more families, abled and disabled see the benefits.

    Reply

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